Transatlantic.

I blog, tumbl and tweet about movies for Fandor. So what you see here will most likely not be about movies.

Mar 30


(via fronmiller)


June 1933: Charlotte Despard speaking at an anti-fascist rally in Trafalgar Square.

June 1933: Charlotte Despard speaking at an anti-fascist rally in Trafalgar Square.


Mar 29
shihlun:

Vahram Muradyan ↻ Marcel Duchamp

shihlun:

Vahram Muradyan ↻ Marcel Duchamp


Mar 28

Mar 27
"The core message of this enormous and enormously important book can be delivered in a few lines: Left to its own devices, wealth inevitably tends to concentrate in capitalist economies. There is no ‘natural’ mechanism inherent in the structure of such economies for inhibiting, much less reversing, that tendency. Only crises like war and depression, or political interventions like taxation (which, to the upper classes, would be a crisis), can do the trick. And Thomas Piketty has two centuries of data to prove his point."
Read on. Doug Henwood remains one of the best explicators of economics for non-economists like myself. Meantime, the page for Capital in the Twenty-First Century at Harvard University Press features a video in which Piketty sums up his argument and a string of links to reports on all the ruckus the book’s been stirring up.

"The core message of this enormous and enormously important book can be delivered in a few lines: Left to its own devices, wealth inevitably tends to concentrate in capitalist economies. There is no ‘natural’ mechanism inherent in the structure of such economies for inhibiting, much less reversing, that tendency. Only crises like war and depression, or political interventions like taxation (which, to the upper classes, would be a crisis), can do the trick. And Thomas Piketty has two centuries of data to prove his point."

Read on. Doug Henwood remains one of the best explicators of economics for non-economists like myself. Meantime, the page for Capital in the Twenty-First Century at Harvard University Press features a video in which Piketty sums up his argument and a string of links to reports on all the ruckus the book’s been stirring up.



Mar 26
Via Dangerous Minds, where you can watch a 1970 performance on Rockpalast (48’11”). The lineup: Ralf, Florian and, on drums, Klaus Dinger. Adds Ron Kretsch: “This was a spiky, angular, experimental, difficult-listening proto-punk music that has very little of the sweetness or wistfulness of something like Tour De France. I love how so much of the camera work is devoted to audience reaction.” Especially since nearly nine minutes go by before Ralf finds a beat.

Via Dangerous Minds, where you can watch a 1970 performance on Rockpalast (48’11”). The lineup: Ralf, Florian and, on drums, Klaus Dinger. Adds Ron Kretsch: “This was a spiky, angular, experimental, difficult-listening proto-punk music that has very little of the sweetness or wistfulness of something like Tour De France. I love how so much of the camera work is devoted to audience reaction.” Especially since nearly nine minutes go by before Ralf finds a beat.


richardturley:

digitalfaun:

I SAW RICHARD TURLEY GIVE A TALK

He said that the world is ruined by men. Anything with more than four men involved is probably terrible. Richard Turley, Bloomberg Businessweek's creative director spoke with no doubts or misconceptions about his job on Sunday. He was invited to speak at OFFSET, an annual arts conference in Dublin and he arrived on the little island by himself. He said that sometimes he would just Google an idea and copy whatever comes up in an image search. He looks younger than what you expect of someone with that title. Turley says he gets paid a lot of money to do what he does. He’s definitely young though. He doesn’t appear small on the stage by any means. There is no hiding behind the podium and he uses his clicker with confidence. It’s clear he knows this presentation well, yet, like his Businessweek covers, nothing ever appears too polished. Conversational would be the right word. He said that sometimes with design it’s difficult to tell what’s good and what’s bad. There are flecks of grey in his hair that don’t suggest aging as much as they suggest wisdom. He said that women’s bodies are boring and complicated. A man’s body is funny. After his talk, he had his portrait taken upstairs where he sat with his knees together and toes turned in. He looks young in those photos. He told us, an audience at a conference highly geared around design, not to take offence but he doesn’t like being around designers. After the photos, he sat by himself downstairs in the lobby, narrowly missing a group of people discuss how his lack of polish is all an act. He looked up from an iPhone that sports a red-and-yellow plastic cover resembling a portion of McDonalds' fries. I agreed with him when, towards the end, he mentions briefly that content is more interesting than systems.

It’s all an act